Stanley Horne (1912 - 1995)

       

 

Stanley Horne (1912 - 1995) inducted in 1996                

Stan Horne, considered one of Canada’s first homebred professional golf stars during the 1930’s and 40’s, was regarded as a pioneer of the game.

During Horne’s stellar career, he epitomized the role of a club professional. He was recognized as one of the fiercest competitors in the country, whose brilliant play made him a force to be reckoned with across North America. His friendly and ever-obliging demeanor to his members was inspirational to some 33 assistants who studied under his tutelage.

Born in England in 1912, Horne’s family moved to Fonthill, Ontario when he was just 6 months old. His father was greens keeper at the Lookout Point Golf Club where his auspicious career began as a caddy.

Horne won his first amateur title at 12 years-old capturing the Ontario Junior Boys championship. Three years later, he won his first club championship at Fonthill and in 1929, he started his professional career tallying up a long list of triumphs.

Horne apprenticed under Fonthill’s renowned golf teacher Art Keeling and his performance in Ontario tournaments earned him the position as playing professional at the Ottawa Hunt Golf Club from 1936-1938.

In 1939, Horne moved to the Islesmere Golf Club. After 29 years, he left Islesmere to fulfill a dream of co-designing and supervising the building of the Nun’s Island golf course. He remained at Nun’s Island until his retirement.

Highlights of Horne’s triumphs include:

·Winning three successive Canadian Professional Golf Association Championships (1936, 1937 and 1938) and finishing as runner-up in 1939 and 1941

·Ranked Canada’s top professional from 1937 through 1940

·Received two invitations to play the Masters at Augusta National – with his best finish at 15th place in 1938

·Eight Québec Open Championships (1937, 1939, 1942, 1944, 1946, 1949, 1953 and 1962)

·The 1939 Québec Golf Association’s Spring Open

·The Miller Trophy, emblematic of the Canadian pro Match-play championship, twice, in 1946 & 1948, as well as finishing twice as a finalist, in 1937 & 1952

·Twice won the Rivermead Cup as low Canadian at the Canadian Open, sharing the title in 1937 and winning it outright in 1939

·Winning the 1962 Canadian Seniors Championship.

During his lifetime, Horne also experienced other thrilling moments including: the 1937 Miami Open, when he led the field after two rounds only to finish third behind winner Sam Snead who fired two successive 66s to overtake him; representing Canada in the International four-ball matches at the Miami Biltmore in 1939, teaming up with Jules Huot to beat Ben Hogan and Lawson Little; competing in the first International Matches for the Hopkin’s Trophy in 1952 at Beaconsfield Golf Club (the Hopkin’s Trophy was the fore-runner to the Canada Cup and is now known as the World Cup).

Horne also holds the world record for the lowest score over nine holes with an unbelievable nine under-par 26 at the Dubsdread course in Orlando, Florida in 1946. It came during a round that preceded the start of the Orlando Open. His playing partners at the time were Jules Huot , Ed Furgol and the host pro Denis Champagne.

Inducted Members of the Québec Golf Hall of Fame

Pierre Archambault (1944 - ) inducted in 2017
Gordon Baxter Taylor (1909 - 1999) inducted in 1996
Adrien Bigras (1938 - ) inducted in 2005
Jocelyne Bourassa (1947 -) inducted in 1996
Graham Cooke (1946 - ) inducted in 2008
Judy Darling-Evans (1937 -) inducted in 1998
Pat Fletcher (1916-1985) inducted in 1998
André Gagné (1944 - ) inducted in 2016
Damien Gauthier (1913 – 1999) inducted in 2000
Christopher Howard Gribbin (1921 - 2012) inducted in 1996
Mary Ann Hayward (1960 -) inducted in 2011
Stanley Horne (1912 - 1995) inducted in 1996
Jules Huot (1908 - 1999) inducted in 1996
The eight Huot brothers - inducted in 1996
Karl Kaspar Keffer (1882-1955) - inducted in 2016
Bill Kerr Sr. (1911 – 1997) inducted in 1997
Albert Henri Murray (1887 - 1974) inducted in 1996
Charles Richard Murray (1882 – 1939) inducted in 1996
Jacques Nols (1945 - ) inducted in 2012
Debbie Savoy Morel (1953 -...) inducted in 2017
Robert "Bob" Vokey (1939 - ) - inducted in 2017